How to Overcome Closed Caption Challenges

In Video/Broadcast, Web Articles by tfwm

ccThe U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) long ago began enacting laws to address captions, and other government entities around the world have done the same. In the U.S., the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act regulates closed captioning for anyone broadcasting content to viewers in the United States, whether by standard over-the-air distribution or over IP. A more recent FCC ruling took captions into the Internet realm, saying that TV networks and video websites must provide closed captions for any TV content available online. The ruling means that, with certain exceptions, any video content that has aired on TV must also have closed captions when streamed online. FCC regulations have also evolved to include requirements for caption correctness, completeness, and timing, and pending review are additional regulations for any video clip being distributed over a streaming service.

When an issue is reported, the burden of proof is on the broadcaster to show that there were no problems. The rules affect every device, website, distributor, producer, and network that carries long-form broadcast content. Houses of worship are no exception. Any church distributing programming via a television broadcast channel — there are close to 30 such churches in the United States alone — is subject to closed captioning regulations. If the church is distributing that same programming over streaming solutions, then it is subject to further regulation as described above. Failure to comply could result not only in fines and penalties, but also in a lower quality of experience for worshippers and a barrier to receiving the church’s message. Though closed captioning doesn’t apply to all ministries now, it will become more and more relevant as churches grow and technologies evolve, such as distribution through OTT providers.

Holy Ghost Festival of Life Deploys URSA Broadcast during Live Production

In Camera, home_page, Install News, Video/Broadcast, Video/Broadcast Install News, Web Articles by admin

Fremont, CA – September 2, 2019 – Blackmagic Design today announced that a multicamera live production workflow, featuring the URSA Broadcast and URSA Mini Pro G2, was employed during the Holy Ghost Festival of Life (FOL) and used to acquire content for big screen projection and live streaming.
Held at London’s ExCel, the 30,000 seater FOL event is one of Europe’s largest gatherings of Christians, which saw people come together for a night of fellowship, praise and prayers.
Hungry Earth Productions utilized its four Blackmagic URSA Broadcast for acquisition, but needed another two cameras to meet the event’s specifications. “The URSA Mini Pro 4.6K G2 was available as a rental option and I was intrigued by the fact it was a hybrid camera with all the familiar onboard broadcast controls,” begins Jerry Curd, director and producer at Hungry Earth.

HOW-TO: Projector Placement and Why Vertical Projection Angles Matter by Dave Rogers

In home_page, Projection, Projection Product News, Video/Broadcast by Victoria Cressatti

There are various factors most know about when setting up a projection system but the proverbial “devil in the details” often goes overlooked. I’m talking about a projector’s vertical alignment. It is a relatively simple function but it has small elements to it that every installer should be aware of and that goes double for houses of worship.  It may be a small matter, but the difference between doing it right and wrong will come with either great rewards or a potentially costly disappointment.   This is especially important for Houses of Worship because there are so many different ways a projection system can be installed and there are often more variables at play than an enclosed conference room or home theater.  As a person of faith, I want to contribute to your congregation’s success. This is one of those AV veteran moments where a small bit of advice can spare you from buying expensive AV gear you don’t need, while getting the best performance out of the equipment you have (or can realistically afford).  This is also a topic that will help enhance you the ability to make wise decisions when buying AV gear whenever an upgrade or new building project is in order.   With all that said, saddle up; for the next few minutes we’ve got  work to do…

JVC Delivers Industry’s First Fully Integrated Facebook Live Camcorder with GY-HM250 Upgrade

In Camera, home_page, Product News, Uncategorized, Video/Broadcast, Video/Broadcast Product News by admin

JVC Professional Video, a division of JVCKENWOOD USA Corporation, today announced a major upgrade to its family of GY-HM250 4KCAM compact handheld camcorders that streamlines connectivity to Facebook Live. The free upgrade, available here, includes a new “Facebook Live” menu choice to simplify the connection process, making the GY-HM250 the first fully integrated Facebook Live professional camcorder in the industry.

DSLR Lens Basics

In Camera, home_page, Video/Broadcast, Video/Broadcast Industry News, Web Articles by admin

As houses of worship take their first steps into videography and broadcast, many are looking at DSLR cameras as a potential solution. If this is the route your house of worship is considering, it’s important to also factor in the different type of lenses available.  Determining the best lens for your situation isn’t always easy. Hopefully, this article will help demystify this issue.

The aperture of your lens determines how much light the lens will allow through to the sensor at peak performance. A lot of light allows the camera person to keep shooting in darker conditions without having to worry about the image blurring. Aperture is clearly stated on all lenses as a number and the smaller the aperture number, the more light entering the camera.

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Z-HD5500 Cameras from Hitachi Kokusai Enable ‘Stunning’ IMAG and Streaming Quality for Calgary’s First Alliance Church

In home_page, Install News, Uncategorized, Video/Broadcast, Video/Broadcast Install News by admin

Woodbury, NY, August 2, 2019 — 80-year-old First Alliance Church (FAC) in Calgary, Alberta produces two distinct live video feeds of their services, each optimized for a particular purpose – image magnification (IMAG) to enrich the worship experience for on-site visitors, and online streaming to reach congregants unable to attend in person. Overhauling their production infrastructure to HD, FAC purchased four Z-HD5500 cameras from Hitachi Kokusai Electric America, Ltd. (Hitachi Kokusai) to capture high-quality video for both applications while accurately reproducing the church’s rich LED lighting effects.